Best Ways to Spend the End of Summer — And How to Transition to Back-to-School

August 14, 2017 2:03 pm

Summer is coming to a close and back-to-school season is just around the corner, so you might be wondering how to make the most of the time you have left at home with the kids. Here are some great ideas for things to do at the end of summer (and ways to make easing into the new school year a bit easier).

  • See a movie at the Dahlgren Theater. Check out a family-friendly movie at the Dahlgren Theater — upcoming movies include Spider-Man: Homecoming, Girls Trip and War for the Planet of the Apes.
  • Plan a picnic. Take advantage of the cooler days by planning a picnic at Barnesfield Park. Plan the perfect menu of picnic recipes, pack it all in a wicker basket and bring along your favorite old blanket to lay in the grass.
  • Go stargazing. Head out to a hillside and bring along a map of the night sky. Spend the evening picking out your favorite stars, constellations and other celestial bodies.
  • Plan out back-to-school lunches. Do a trial run of the new school lunches you might like to pack for your kids this year. Whether you want to try out healthy pasta salads or a new type of sandwich, you can have fun (and teach the kids the ins and outs of healthy meal planning) by working together to develop a new lunch menu.
  • Donate unworn clothes before back-to-school shopping. Before you go shopping for the kids' new clothes, go through their closets and make piles of items to donate. Have the kids try on their old jeans and too-small sweaters, and then take them to a local charity store before you hit the mall.

Public Domain/Pixabay/Pexels

Category: Community Availability Tags: , , ,


Happy Fourth of July, Dahlgren!

July 3, 2017 2:28 pm

Happy Fourth of July, Dahlgren residents! Here are some fun facts about this patriotic holiday.

  • While many people believe that the Declaration of Independence was signed on July 4, there were actually only two people who signed on July 4: John Hancock and Charles Thomson. secretary of Congress. The others signed on August 2.
  • John Adams wanted to celebrate Independence Day on July 2, the day Congress voted for independence.
  • President Calvin Coolidge was born on July 4.
  • Three US presidents have died on July 4: John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and James Monroe. Adams and Jefferson actually both died on July 4, 1826, the fiftieth anniversary of the country they helped found.
  • July 4 didn't become a federal holiday until 1870, nearly 100 years after the nation was founded.
  • In 1884, miners blew up the post office in Swan, Colorado, because it wasn't supplied with fireworks.
  • Americans consume around 155 million hot dogs on the Fourth of July each year.

10 unusual facts you probably didn't know about the Fourth of July [Business Insider]

Public Domain/Pixabay/Pexels

Category: Community Availability Tags: , , ,


Happy National Hammock Day!

June 22, 2017 11:41 am

Yesterday was the first day of summer, so it's only fitting that today is National Hammock Day. There's no better way to celebrate the summer season than by posting up between two trees for a day of reading, relaxing or snuggling up with the one you love.

Here are some fun facts about hammocks that you might not know.

  • Hammocks were first invented by the Central and South Americans for sleeping off of the ground.
  • Later, hammocks were used by sailors aboard ships to save space and create a more comfortable bed than the hard ground.
  • In the 1920s, hammocks were used by parents to contain babies just learning to crawl.
  • The earliest hammocks were made of tree bark! Since then, hammocks have been made of rope, sisal, palm fronds and other natural materials.
  • The earliest hammocks prevented against disease and attack. Their breathable materials didn't get infected with viruses and disease the way blankets and mattresses did, and because they kept the sleeper elevated off the ground, they protected against bites from snakes, scorpions and other venomous creatures.
  • Styles of hammocks reflect the regions where they originated. For example, the Mayan and Nicaraguan hammocks have a loose weave made from a supportive net, while Brazilian hammocks are made of a cotton fabric that is a bit more durable.

Category: Community Availability Tags: , , ,


Pin It on Pinterest